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Editorials

Welcome lift from NASA

We all need a bit of a psychological pick-me-up. The tough fight against COVID-19 is taking its tool on us emotionally. Coronavirus blues, meet the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Just in time to give our spirts a boost, NASA is planning to send a new group of astronauts into ...

Legislators should forgo summer plans

After being told for weeks to “stay at home,” Pennsylvanians should start a new rallying cry: “Stay in Harrisburg.” Traditionally, after passing a budget around July 1, the General Assembly goes on a two-month-plus vacation, euphemistically referred to as a district work period. But ...

Don’t forget census

More than a month into the 2020 census, many people have yet to respond. As of Wednesday, 57.3 percent of households nationwide had responded, and just a bit more, 59.9 percent, of Pennsylvania households had responded. Blair County residents have done a little better, census data shows, ...

PA drags its feet on CRNAs

A proposed measure not acted upon by the Pennsylvania General Assembly prior to the conclusion of its two-year legislative session does not carry over automatically to the following session. In order for the measure to have any hope of becoming law, it must be reintroduced and get back onto the ...

CARES Act not for past state deficits

The $150 billion in federal aid intended to help states with expenses related to COVID-19 should not be a case of water, water everywhere — but not a drop to drink. Unfortunately, some governors worry that may be the case. One might have assumed that in the 880 or so pages of text ...

Word to wise: Vaccines still important

Amid these uncertain, scary times, when COVID-19 refuses to release its deadly grip on this country, the proverbial seeds are being planted — at least in some parts of the nation — for other health problems, these involving children. There have been no numbers released about how ...

Nix bailout for state pensions

Within a month, Congress and President Donald Trump have increased the national debt by more than 10% by enacting about $2.7 trillion in bailouts related to the COVID-19 outbreak. American families, businesses, hospitals and local and state governments are among the beneficiaries. That is ...

Let’s cross our fingers for Georgia

A great experiment is underway in the United States. Led by a few states — notably, Georgia — we are trying to determine how and when to begin recovering from the COVID-19 epidemic. We know the risk: Allow people and businesses to ease away from restrictions put in place to limit the ...

AMED’s quiet time concerning

Last week produced plenty of rumblings in Harrisburg about the Wolf administration’s alleged secretive handling of information about where coronavirus cases had been identified. The concerns came as no surprise since, it was argued, first-responders should be aware, as much as possible, ...

Tuition lawsuits misguided

During their future career choices and work lives, most of today’s college students will be confronted with unexpected, challenging circumstances that they will need to manage and navigate, using their best judgment, talents and instincts. Unfortunately, they now are being forced to ...

Wolf’s plan shortchanges Blair County

There might be legitimate reasons for organizing Pennsylvania’s counties into six regions for administrative purposes, but using those same divisions as a qualifier for easing COVID-19 restrictions is simply absurd. And if Gov. Tom Wolf ignores common sense and sticks to his plan, the ...

Alcohol demand still high

Which has the longer odds: Pennsylvanians finding rubbing alcohol in a store or Pennsylvanians obtaining liquor from a state store? It’s anybody’s guess. It’s been difficult to find rubbing alcohol — as well as hand sanitizer, disinfectant wipes and toilet paper — since the ...

Monitor needless burning

Not all Gallitzin Borough residents are happy about the municipality’s new total ban on burning. The municipality has had a burning ban in effect since 2006, but the one exception to that rule has been “friendship fires” — small fires meant for enjoyment. Now, those fires are ...

Testing accuracy essential

Going on the offensive against COVID-19 will require knowing more about who has had the disease, perhaps without showing symptoms. To that end, new tests have been developed and are being perfected. Most seem to rely on detecting antibodies the body produces to fight and often, defeat ...

Address increasing US debt

COVID-19 is focusing attention on another epidemic in the United States. It is the national debt, now at approximately $24.3 trillion. To that, of course, will have to be added the at least $2 trillion in federal funding to save the economy from being another victim of the virus. Think about ...

Politics should take back seat

Democratic Party leaders in the House of Representatives are preparing to launch a formal investigation into how President Donald Trump’s administration has handled the COVID-19 crisis, it has been reported. At some point, such an examination needs to be conducted — but not as an exercise ...

Heighten your prayer this Easter

Although saddened, stunned and horrified over the COVID-19 pandemic, people here and around the world are embracing in their hearts the deeper, more consequential meaning of this Easter Sunday for all humanity. The Resurrection — Jesus Christ’s victory over death — not only is a source ...

Refine CARES program

A CARES-2 Act needs to be written and enacted as soon as possible in Washington — not necessarily to pump more money into the national COVID-19 recovery effort but to correct flaws in the original law. The ink is barely dry on the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, which was ...

Tourism may have to reboot

Any Blair County resident who recalls the Sunday afternoon mystery tours of about a half-century ago knows that it was during those years that “tourism enlightenment” really began to blossom here. To participate in the tours, couples or families obtained “sealed orders” at a designated ...

Parents’ role now magnified

For millions of American students, public schools have been closed since mid-March. School has been wherever a quiet place could be found in the home. For most, class starts when they and their parents decide it will. That simply will not work for many children. There is a reason we still ...