Police investigate assault at McCoy’s home

Police acknowledged Tuesday that a woman was assaulted during a home invasion at a suburban Atlanta house owned by NFL star LeSean McCoy, hours after graphic posts on social media accused the Buffalo Bills running back of bloodying his former girlfriend.

One female was treated and released from the hospital, while another sustained a minor injury during a targeted invasion early Tuesday, Milton police said in a release responding to requests by The Associated Press.

McCoy denied allegations posted on social media earlier in the day accusing him of hurting his former girlfriend.

“For the record, the totally baseless and offensive claims made against me today on social media are completely false,” McCoy said in a statement released on two of his social media accounts. “Further more, I have not had any direct contact with any of the people involved in months.”

McCoy was responding to an Instagram post from a person who said she is friends with the injured woman. The post showed a graphic photo of the former girlfriend and accused McCoy of physically abusing her, his son and his dog, as well as injecting steroids.

The woman who posted the accusations and the ex-girlfriend have not responded to messages left by The Associated Press, though both Instagram accounts showed pictures of the women together in London during a music festival, with comments on each other’s posts. The AP generally does not identify people who may have been victims of abuse.

Police said it’s not clear how many suspects were involved, but one demanded specific items from one of the women in the home.

Police spokesman Charles Barstow said he could not release any further details.

The Bills issued a statement saying they have been in contact with McCoy and the NFL and will continue gathering information. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said the league is reviewing the matter.

McCoy turns 30 on Thursday and is preparing to enter his fourth season with the Bills. He spent his first six seasons with the Philadelphia Eagles, where he led the NFL in yards rushing in 2013 before being traded to Buffalo in 2015. He has never been suspended by the NFL for using performance enhancing substances during his nine-year career.

Fulton County Magistrate Court records show that McCoy initiated eviction proceedings against the former girlfriend in July 2017, saying that the pair were no longer in a relationship.

Court records show two attempts to serve the former girlfriend with the document but no other action. Eviction paperwork was filed again last month with McCoy listed as the plaintiff and the woman and “and all others” listed as the defendant.

The sworn statement to initiate the proceedings was signed by Tamarcus Porter, who played football with McCoy in college.

Porter was arrested with McCoy following a nightclub brawl involving off-duty police officers in Philadelphia in February 2016. No charges were filed after prosecutors said they could not prove who initiated the fight in which two officers were injured.

The sworn statement signed by Porter said McCoy is the owner of the house and that his ex-girlfriend was refusing to leave.

Elsewhere:

n Prosecutors say former NFL cornerback Brandon Browner has been charged with trying to kill his ex-girlfriend after breaking into her Southern California home. Browner, who won Super Bowls with the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots, was arrested Sunday east of Los Angeles.

The LA County District Attorney’s Office says the 33-year-old was charged Tuesday with attempted murder, first-degree residential robbery and other counts. It wasn’t immediately clear if he has a lawyer. Arraignment is scheduled for July 30.

Prosecutors say Browner broke into the apartment, chased and dragged the woman and then tried to smother her in a carpet. Prosecutors say he also stole a Rolex watch valued at about $20,000.

n The NFL Players Association filed a grievance with the league on Tuesday challenging its national anthem policy. The union says that the new policy, which the league imposed without consultation with the NFLPA, is inconsistent with the collective bargaining agreement and infringes on players’ rights. The filing met a statute of limitations deadline and will be heard by an independent arbitrator, an NFLPA spokesman said.

n While new Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper would like the focus to be on his plans for the team’s future, he cannot completely put the franchise’s sullied past behind him. Tepper has to keep the prominent statue of Panthers’ founder Jerry Richardson outside of the stadium as part of the NFL-record $2.2 billion deal he agreed to in June after Richardson decided to sell the team in December amid reports of sexual and racial misconduct in the workplace.

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