Companies exploit marijuana loophole

Buy a shirt, get pot ‘gift’

BOSTON — That ordinary bottle of juice delivered to your doorstep will set you back at least $55. But the bag of marijuana that comes with it? On the house.

Retail marijuana stores are months away from opening in Massachusetts, but some companies have been quietly operating for more than a year, selling and delivering marijuana via a legal loophole that exists in nearly every state that has legalized recreational marijuana use.

Companies like HighSpeed, which describes itself as a juice delivery service, are exploiting so-called “gifting” provisions that allow for the exchange of small amounts of the drug, so long as it’s given away — “gifted” — from one adult to another.

The legal language makes it permissible to pass a joint at a party or drop a bud in your brother’s Christmas stocking, but some entrepreneurs see it as an opportunity to get ahead of the regulated market, planting an early stake in what could become a crowded and lucrative industry.

In places where legal pot shops exist, gifting operations undercut the licensed retailers because they don’t face the same oversight or pay marijuana sales taxes. And they complicate things in places like Vermont, Maine, and Washington, D.C., which have legalized pot but have no firm plans to open regulated storefronts.

“Under any fair reading of the law, these businesses are illegal,” said Roger Katz, a Republican state senator in Maine who is studying the issue.

At least four enterprises have done gifting business in Massachusetts since marijuana was legalized in December 2016, two of them in the Boston area, The Associated Press found in an investigation that included records gathered from law enforcement agencies around the state.

In Springfield, officials ordered a smoke shop called Mary Jane Makes Your Heart Sing to shut down last March after it gave marijuana to customers who paid a $25 to $50 admission fee.

That hasn’t scared HighSpeed, which also operates in D.C.

“We’ve had no issues with law enforcement, and we’re going to do our best to keep it that way,” said founder David Umeh. “We’re not doing anything wrong. We’re abiding by the current legislation until it changes.”