Editorials

Mentally disabled centers are vital

In January, the state of Pennsylvania announced the closing of Hamburg State Center. This is one of the five remaining state centers for the intellectually disabled. This is done to save money. They will move the residents into homes in the community or the house next door. Centers for ...

Don’t use tax money for bonuses

Even if there now weren’t questions regarding leftover funds from last year’s Democratic National Convention held in Philadelphia, an audit like the one being initiated by the Pennsylvania Auditor General’s Office would have been a logical exercise. The fact that a grant of $10 million ...

Home for Lt. Gov. is a luxury

The question of whether financially strapped Pennsylvania should continue to provide an official taxpayer-funded residence for its lieutenant governor is relevant now, but it should have been addressed a long time ago, considering the savings that could have been realized. With state ...

Repealing ACA would have devastating effect

With my husband battling cancer for the past two years, I have seen firsthand how quickly medical costs can skyrocket. The House Republicans’ repeal and replace bill would have a devastating effect on every family facing serious illness by repealing the essential benefits provisions in the ...

We must stand up to hackers

Which of government’s protective functions is more important: safeguarding us against computer hackers or detecting and stopping the next terrorist plot or, perhaps, slowing down a rogue nation’s missile or nuclear program? As more and more global extortionists demand money in exchange ...

Expanded AG power needs more scrutiny The Pennsylvania General Assembly has plenty of 2017-18 budget work remaining as the June 30 deadline for completing a spending plan hangs less than a month and a half away. However, two legislative proposals — one involving pension forfeiture and ...

Gorsuch’s teaching moment

A case the U.S. Supreme Court may handle this week raises troubling questions — but they are not limited to those many in the media and the courts are addressing. Reporters have focused on the case because it is one new Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch dealt with while he was a ...

Harder line on DUIs is good step

Beginning in August, as the result of a law passed last year, Pennsylvania will begin requiring first-time drunken drivers to get ignition interlock systems installed on their vehicles. What that means is that, before the person’s car will start, the driver will, in effect, be required to ...

Arrest of Altoona cop raises troubling questions

Altoona residents should have no doubts that Blair County’s criminal justice system will handle fairly and properly the case involving city police Sgt. Matthew S. Starr. Last week, state police filed 10 felony charges and a misdemeanor theft count against the veteran officer for ...

Tragedy stains PSU again

The 18 Penn State University fraternity members charged last week in connection with the death of a pledge in February are innocent until proven guilty. However, evidence compiled by a grand jury that was the basis for the criminal charges filed against the brothers of Beta Theta Pi has ...

Hillary remains in denial

Hillary Clinton apparently believes 26.4 million American women hate themselves, along with everyone else of their gender. During an interview last week, Clinton was asked why she thought she lost the presidential election last fall. In typical fashion, she blamed everyone but herself and ...

Expanded gambling won’t solve budget

As Pennsylvania inches closer to allowing its casinos and the state lottery to take their games online, the obvious question becomes whether those new revenue sources would make a significant-enough dent in the commonwealth’s projected $3 billion shortfall to make that move wise. An even ...

Gambling findings deceiving

The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board’s director of compulsive and problem gambling — Elizabeth Lanza — says “gambling addiction is a huge, enormous problem for (only) a very small percentage of people.” Her use of the words “small percentage” in relation to the state’s ...

AG audit concern for state

Last Tuesday, shareholders of Wells Fargo & Co., still reeling from a widespread sales-practices scandal, dealt the bank’s directors what the Wall Street Journal described as a “stinging rebuke rarely seen in corporate elections.” Pennsylvania residents, who in fact are shareholders ...

Snooping on citizens a concern

Much of the media attention on the intelligence community’s surveillance activities has focused on top government officials, right up to and including President Donald Trump. But what about the rest of us? Is the government snooping on Jane and John Q. Public, too? Some members of ...

Frein sentence, sadly, won’t bring closure

Killer Eric Frein’s sentence of death by lethal injection is the punishment he deserves. Actually, a death sentence by any means would be appropriate. Frein killed one Pennsylvania state trooper and left another permanently disabled during a nighttime ambush Sept. 12, 2014, at the Blooming ...

Lt. Gov. stacks his own cards

Pennsylvania residents’ respect for Lt. Gov. Mike Stack was undermined earlier this month by allegations that the lieutenant governor and his wife had mistreated state employees assigned to them and their official state-owned property at Fort Indiantown Gap near Harrisburg. Public ...

State should cut voting age down to 17

The nearly 500 pieces of legislation that have been introduced around the country this year aimed at increasing voter participation include proposals to lower the voting age from 18 to 17. Pennsylvania should adopt that change, and the U.S. Constitution should be amended to permit the lower ...

Volunteerism should be embraced

National Volunteer Week, which will be observed across the United States beginning Sunday, is an opportunity for all Central Pennsylvania residents to reflect on how they might help make someone else’s life better, while also bringing more satisfaction and fulfillment to their own ...

Ward plan needs help from Senate

The positive persistence of state Rep. Judy Ward, R-Hollidaysburg, in trying to get a blight-fighting bill through the Legislature should not be overlooked. However, if the measure fails to gain approval during the current legislative session, Ward will need to employ a different tactic ...