On this date

50 YEARS AGO:

Feb. 22, 1969

The Altoona YMCA, the Rev. Robert A. Dilliard board president, honored Altoona Mirror president and general manager J.E. Holtzinger for “appreciation of devoted service to the youth of the community.”

25 YEARS AGO:

Feb. 22, 1994

Dede Kazmaier of Hollidaysburg, a certified image consultant with Color Me Beautiful, was teaching a course on women’s scarves, color and tying them, at the Women’s HealthSouth Center next week. Barbizon School of Altoona was supplying models.

10 YEARS AGO:

Feb. 22, 2009

A state grant for $1.3 million was approved for a new ball field at Blair County Ballpark, Lakemont, due to a water drainage problem, setting off a debate on whether or not public funds should be used for private business.

–Compiled by Tim Doyle

Today is Friday, Feb. 22, the 53rd day of 2019. There are 312 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 22, 1997, scientists in Scotland announced they had succeeded in cloning an adult mammal, producing a lamb named “Dolly.” (Dolly, however, was later put down after a short life marred by premature aging and disease.)

On this date:

In 1630, English colonists in the Massachusetts Bay Colony first sampled popcorn brought to them by a Native American named Quadequina for their Thanksgiving celebration.

In 1732, the first president of the United States, George Washington, was born in Westmoreland County in the Virginia Colony.

In 1862, Jefferson Davis, already the provisional president of the Confederacy, was inaugurated for a six-year term following his election in November 1861.

In 1909, the Great White Fleet, a naval task force sent on a round-the-world voyage by President Theodore Roosevelt, returned after more than a year at sea.

In 1935, it became illegal for airplanes to fly over the White House.

In 1959, the inaugural Daytona 500 race was held; although Johnny Beauchamp was initially declared the winner, the victory was later awarded to Lee Petty.

In 1965, former Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter, 82, died in Washington, D.C.

In 1967, more than 25,000 U.S. and South Vietnamese troops launched Operation Junction City, aimed at smashing a Vietcong stronghold near the Cambodian border. (Although the Communists were driven out, they later returned.)

In 1974, Pakistan officially recognized Bangladesh (formerly East Pakistan).

In 1980, the “Miracle on Ice” took place in Lake Placid, New York, as the United States Olympic hockey team upset the Soviets, 4-3. (The U.S. team went on to win the gold medal.)

In 1984, David Vetter, a 12-year-old Texas boy who’d spent most of his life in a plastic bubble because he had no immunity to disease, died 15 days after being removed from the bubble for a bone-marrow transplant.

In 1987, pop artist Andy Warhol died at a New York City hospital at age 58.

COMMENTS